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Linux popularity across the globe

The Linux landscape is constantly changing and has a strong community of both developers and users. But where is Linux the most popular, and where are the different Linux distributions the most popular?

To try to answer these questions, we have looked at data from Google with the highly useful Insights for Search, which gave us a number of interesting and often surprising results.

Aside from just looking at Linux itself, we have included eight common Linux distributions in this survey: Ubuntu, OpenSUSE, Fedora, Debian, Red Hat, Mandriva, Slackware and Gentoo.

(We use both Ubuntu and Red Hat here at Pingdom, so of course we had to include those two!)

How we determined popularity

To have a way to judge popularity, we have looked at where a specific search term is most popular, i.e. how likely it is for someone in a region (country or state) to search for that specific term, for example “Linux” or “Ubuntu”. Google calls this “regional interest”.

If a high proportion of the searches in a country are for the term “Linux”, this should also indicate that Linux is popular in that country, or at least that there is a high interest in Linux.

Linux popularity globally

On a global level, the interest in Linux seems to be the strongest in India, Cuba and Russia, followed by the Czech Republic and Indonesia (and Bangladesh, which has the same regional interest level as Indonesia). The first Western country when looking at regional popularity is Germany which is the 10th country in regards to search popularity for Linux.

Linux popularity map

Linux popularity in the United States

In the United States, interest appears significantly stronger in Utah and California than the rest of the country. California’s high position is understandable, considering it is the home of Silicon Valley, but we are not sure why the interest for Linux is even higher in Utah. Perhaps some of our readers might shed some light on this?

Linux popularity map USA

You can dig deeper into Google’s search statistics for Linux here.

Global popularity of the different Linux distributions

As mentioned in the introduction, we looked at eight common distributions: Ubuntu, OpenSUSE, Fedora, Debian, Red Hat, Mandriva, Slackware and Gentoo.

Some interesting observations
  • Ubuntu is most popular in Italy and Cuba.
  • OpenSUSE is most popular in Russia and the Czech Republic.
  • Red Hat is most popular in Bangladesh and Nepal.
  • Debian is most popular in Cuba.
  • Cuba is in the top five (interest-wise) of three of the eight distributions in this survey.
  • Indonesia is in the top five of four of the distributions.
  • Russia and the Czech Republic are in the top five of five of the distributions.
  • The United States is not in the top five of any of the distributions.

Note again that when we say “popular” here, we mean how popular the search term is. After all, this is based on Google search data.

It might also be worth pointing out that the results are normalized, so the size of each region is removed as a factor. In other words, everything is in proportion to the size of the region (the total number of searches in that region, we assume). That means that larger regions are not favored over small, as would be the case otherwise.

Now on to the results for the individual Linux distributions.

Ubuntu

Ubuntu popularity map

Countries with highest interest in Ubuntu:

  1. Italy
  2. Cuba
  3. Indonesia
  4. Norway
  5. Czech Republic

Dig deeper into Google’s search statistics for Ubuntu here.

OpenSUSE

OpenSUSE popularity map

Countries with highest interest in OpenSUSE:

  1. Russia
  2. Czech Republic
  3. Moldova
  4. Germany
  5. Indonesia

Dig deeper into Google’s search statistics for OpenSUSE here.

Fedora

Fedora popularity map

Countries with highest interest in Fedora:

  1. Sri Lanka
  2. Bangladesh
  3. India
  4. Nepal
  5. Zimbabwe

Dig deeper into Google’s search statistics for Fedora here.

Debian

Debian popularity map

Countries with highest interest in Debian:

  1. Cuba
  2. Czech Republic
  3. Germany
  4. Belarus
  5. Russia

Dig deeper into Google’s search statistics for Debian here.

Red Hat

Red Hat popularity map

Countries with highest interest in Red Hat:

  1. Bangladesh
  2. Nepal
  3. Sri Lanka
  4. India
  5. Cuba

Dig deeper into Google’s search statistics for Red Hat here.

Mandriva

Madriva popularity map

Countries with highest interest in Mandriva:

  1. Russia
  2. Czech Republic
  3. Poland
  4. France
  5. Indonesia

Dig deeper into Google’s search statistics for Mandriva here.

Slackware

Slackware popularity map

Countries with highest interest in Slackware:

  1. Bulgaria
  2. Indonesia
  3. Brazil
  4. Russia
  5. Poland

Dig deeper into Google’s search statistics for Slackware here.

Gentoo

Gentoo popularity map

Countries with highest interest in Gentoo:

  1. Russia
  2. Czech Republic
  3. Belarus
  4. Moldova
  5. Estonia

Dig deeper into Google’s search statistics for Gentoo here.

Conclusion

Linux has a lot of distributions (though Ubuntu is currently dominating the scene according to Distrowatch), but although we only included eight of those distributions it seems clear that many of them are favored by very different regions of the world. In other words, the distribution of the distributions (pardon the pun) is far from uniform.

In general, Linux seems to have a stronger popularity in the East than in the West, with some exceptions (like Cuba). This is perhaps not surprising, considering that it is free software and many of the countries where Linux is most popular have a relatively low income per capita compared to most countries in the West. Or perhaps there is just a stronger focus on free software and Open Source in these regions.

This could also indicate a weaker standing for Windows in the East.

We would love to hear your opinion on the results, especially from Linux users living in the countries mentioned in this survey. Let us know what you think in the comments!



203 comments
ambro_86
ambro_86

Ah, I think I figured a big part of the Utah connection out! Novell is headquartered here. And in 2003 Novell bought SUSE, which contributes to OpenSUSE.  You must forgive me I'm still a Linux noob so I wasn't aware of the connection.

ambro_86
ambro_86

Ah, I think I figured a big part of the Utah connection out! Novell is headquartered here. And in 2003 Novell bought SUSE, which contributes to OpenSUSE. 

You must forgive me I'm still a Linux noob so I wasn't aware of the connection.

ambro_86
ambro_86

@Edward Cherlin Ah yeah, I didn't think of the LDS Church. I just posted about all the big tech companies in Utah. But the LDS Church has a pretty big IT presence as well.

ambro_86
ambro_86

@infamous I'm a Mint fan. But I'm thinking it got lumped in with Ubuntu since it's Ubuntu based.  Don't worry though, Mint is forking off more and more to the point where I think it will get it's own honorable mention increasingly over time. Mint just came out with their Debian edition and cut out Ubuntu completely, so it remains to be seen if the Mint project will go that way as whole eventually, which would actually drop some of the Ubuntu numbers because Mint would become a direct competitor instead of just a child of Ubuntu.

ambro_86
ambro_86

@Ty And Overstock.com, and many others really.

ambro_86
ambro_86

Utah, represent! Glad to see we're at such a high level in the Linux world there.  As far as why Utah is so high, it's hard to say since I don't have direct evidence to back me up, so take whatever I say as my own personal opinion. First, Utah actually has quite a few tech companies, like Overstock.com, Omniture, Xmission, and Ancestry.com. So naturally we have the business presence to make getting into Linux for a job quite attractive. And there's even a website dedicated to Utah's own "silicon slopes" that is all about tech companies in Utah. Here's their website: http://www.siliconslopes.com/company/search-companies A major area of tech company development is in Provo, where we recently just got Google Fiber. But one big reason why we got Fiber was because we already had the infrastructure of fiber optic cables in place. So really Google doesn't have to build anything. They may have to upgrade some areas to meet their standards for Fiber, but really the Provo Valley is already wired for fiber optic internet.  Utah is also very business friendly with laws that are favorable for businesses (liquor laws are very strict though, and restaurants run into licensing issues). And because we have lots of companies here to employ people the whole area is growing rapidly. We actually fared much better in the recession than many other states and have posted much lower unemployment rate than the rest of the nation since 2008. We have been getting a lot of attention from big companies lately too and many are building offices here. Adobe just built a huge facility 25 minutes from where I live, and the area they built in isn't too far from a big microchip manufacturer, Micron, and EMC has offices here too. And that whole area will likely fill up with many more tech companies, both start ups and established companies, in the coming years.  And the need for IT for other non-tech companies also drives the use, and interest in Linux. We have engineering, biomedical, healthcare, and other industries that rely on a good IT workforce. And actually I'm a Computer Science major right now and have been looking at my career options, and I could stay here in Utah easily and be a part of the exciting tech scene going on here.   Lastly, Utahns have a high interest in Linux because we're just cool like that. I picked up Linux because I thought it would be cool to learn. I'm still a noob, but I'm having loads of fun with it.

ambro_86
ambro_86

Utah, represent! Glad to see we're at such a high level in the Linux world there. 

As far as why Utah is so high, it's hard to say since I don't have direct evidence to back me up, so take whatever I say as my own personal opinion.

First, Utah actually has quite a few tech companies, like Overstock.com, Omniture, Xmission, and Ancestry.com. So naturally we have the business presence to make getting into Linux for a job quite attractive. And there's even a website dedicated to Utah's own "silicon slopes" that is all about tech companies in Utah. Here's their website:

http://www.siliconslopes.com/company/search-companies

A major area of tech company development is in Provo, where we recently just got Google Fiber. But one big reason why we got Fiber was because we already had the infrastructure of fiber optic cables in place. So really Google doesn't have to build anything. They may have to upgrade some areas to meet their standards for Fiber, but really the Provo Valley is already wired for fiber optic internet. 

Utah is also very business friendly with laws that are favorable for businesses (liquor laws are very strict though, and restaurants run into licensing issues). And because we have lots of companies here to employ people the whole area is growing rapidly. We actually fared much better in the recession than many other states and have posted much lower unemployment rate than the rest of the nation since 2008. We have been getting a lot of attention from big companies lately too and many are building offices here. Adobe just built a huge facility 25 minutes from where I live, and the area they built in isn't too far from a big microchip manufacturer, Micron, and EMC has offices here too. And that whole area will likely fill up with many more tech companies, both start ups and established companies, in the coming years. 

And the need for IT for other non-tech companies also drives the use, and interest in Linux. We have engineering, biomedical, healthcare, and other industries that rely on a good IT workforce.

And actually I'm a Computer Science major right now and have been looking at my career options, and I could stay here in Utah easily and be a part of the exciting tech scene going on here.
 
Lastly, Utahns have a high interest in Linux because we're just cool like that. I picked up Linux because I thought it would be cool to learn. I'm still a noob, but I'm having loads of fun with it. 

Taran
Taran

Its really a great info for me.I learned a lot from this post.You have put lot of useful info in one post, thanks.

marc11
marc11

Please pardon my verbosity in advance. It seemed a bit strange that the U.S. didn't rank highly on the charts at first but, then again, there are obvious reasons for this (in my opinion). First, MS brought the computer into the home, essentially, though Mac was there for those with more money and with serious focus on a particular subject, e.g. art. And even though we think of ourselves as individualists, we tend "to go with the flow", and we are afraid of change. I began with Win 3.1 and followed through to XP, though in the XP days I started to check out Linux (OpenSUSE), but I wasn't ready to drop Windows. As everyone knows, once you have MS-compatible software you face a tough situation. Also, we tend to stay in the "comfort zone" no matter how much trouble we have. Secondly, MS spends millions on advertising, which in essence is a great way to brainwash the people of the U.S. Show us an advertisement with flash and we're hooked, if we aren't already. Linux doesn't advertise much which is all but the kiss of death here. Then of course there is the fact that a new computer comes with Windows, unless one actually has knowledge/desire to search for one with another OS, and that is rare. My latest computer came with Vista and since it was on special, didn't even offer an XP "downgrade", so I bought a fresh copy of XP. Problem solved, right? Wrong! XP didn't recognize my HD, so I was p'ed. However, good advice came from "LINUX_newbies", a Yahoo group. Install Linux Mint and VirtualBox and put XP there. Problem solved! (Thanks, Loyal!) Bottom line...anyone who isn't using Linux is missing out, but at least it's here, and getting better all the time. Mark P.S. There are so many great distro's out there, as everyone knows, but if you haven't tried Mint you must! Great desktop, great hardware recognition.

<a href="http://www.alquilerdeyatesenibiza.com" target="_blank">http://yates en ibiza</a>.

marc11
marc11

Please pardon my verbosity in advance. It seemed a bit strange that the U.S. didn't rank highly on the charts at first but, then again, there are obvious reasons for this (in my opinion). First, MS brought the computer into the home, essentially, though Mac was there for those with more money and with serious focus on a particular subject, e.g. art. And even though we think of ourselves as individualists, we tend "to go with the flow", and we are afraid of change. I began with Win 3.1 and followed through to XP, though in the XP days I started to check out Linux (OpenSUSE), but I wasn't ready to drop Windows. As everyone knows, once you have MS-compatible software you face a tough situation. Also, we tend to stay in the "comfort zone" no matter how much trouble we have. Secondly, MS spends millions on advertising, which in essence is a great way to brainwash the people of the U.S. Show us an advertisement with flash and we're hooked, if we aren't already. Linux doesn't advertise much which is all but the kiss of death here. Then of course there is the fact that a new computer comes with Windows, unless one actually has knowledge/desire to search for one with another OS, and that is rare. My latest computer came with Vista and since it was on special, didn't even offer an XP "downgrade", so I bought a fresh copy of XP. Problem solved, right? Wrong! XP didn't recognize my HD, so I was p'ed. However, good advice came from "LINUX_newbies", a Yahoo group. Install Linux Mint and VirtualBox and put XP there. Problem solved! (Thanks, Loyal!) Bottom line...anyone who isn't using Linux is missing out, but at least it's here, and getting better all the time. Mark P.S. There are so many great distro's out there, as everyone knows, but if you haven't tried Mint you must! Great desktop, great hardware recognition. <a href="http://www.alquilerdeyatesenibiza.com" target="_blank"> en ibiza</a>.

activekita
activekita

Ubuntu is very interesting, and needs to consider

Volomike
Volomike

I really think that cpanel has a LOT to do with this. Currently, cpanel does not work with any Linux other than RH or RH-derivatives like Fedora or CentOS. I'm a huge Ubuntu fan, so this is disappointing. Sure, we can use webmin, but it's not as smooth as cpanel. But anyway, without cpanel support, it means that several hosting providers have avoided Ubuntu, which hurts Debian and Ubuntu stats. I really think Canonical.com should take this matter seriously and try to work with the cpanel team, or come up with a cpanel-knockoff.

zeta
zeta

While I like this study, I find the methodology a bit dubious. Here in Germany Ubuntu is pushed by the very lively Ubuntu website (ubuntusers.de), and chances are most german users get their install files through them. Since they also have a big wiki and forum, you probably will go there once you encounter any problems. Fact is, although I started four years ago with Ubuntu, I cannot remember when I ever googled a problem, I just went straight to the website and looked there for advice.

Fath17
Fath17

glad to know Indonesia is in top five open source distribution, but i am worry our government did not many support to evolving open source software.

Wojtek
Wojtek

I come from Poland and it seems pretty strange to me that Poland is mentioned in the list (Mandriva). Polish government is close-source oriented (agreements with Microsoft). A few organizations try to change it but it is quite difficult. Polish school teaches old, closed technologies: attending to school you learn Microsoft Word, Excell, PowerPoint. But it depends mostly on teachers who are taught close-source from the cradle. But there is a little light at the end of the tunnel: recently Polish Electronic Communication Office (UKE) has supported Jabber and adopted it: and it happened in result of a few enthusiasts who persuaded officials. :)

threethirty
threethirty

I don't think all of these people are interested in just a kernel. I'm sure that the GNU tools and other projects are more of interest to people so can we call it GNU+Linux. Don't get me wrong the Linux kernel is the bees knees but I think calling what is being searched for GNU+Linux might be more fitting.

blue
blue

@mr. sabri, the Indonesian government task is to foster a conducive environment for open source development and movement in Indonesia. The fact that Blankon (developed by the ubuntu community) grow rapidly and widely used by computer users in Indonesia, shows that the government have done a good job :D

mind author
mind author

in my opinion, ubuntu is still the best for the desktop

darksyde
darksyde

Please pardon my verbosity in advance. It seemed a bit strange that the U.S. didn't rank highly on the charts at first but, then again, there are obvious reasons for this (in my opinion). First, MS brought the computer into the home, essentially, though Mac was there for those with more money and with serious focus on a particular subject, e.g. art. And even though we think of ourselves as individualists, we tend "to go with the flow", and we are afraid of change. I began with Win 3.1 and followed through to XP, though in the XP days I started to check out Linux (OpenSUSE), but I wasn't ready to drop Windows. As everyone knows, once you have MS-compatible software you face a tough situation. Also, we tend to stay in the "comfort zone" no matter how much trouble we have. Secondly, MS spends millions on advertising, which in essence is a great way to brainwash the people of the U.S. Show us an advertisement with flash and we're hooked, if we aren't already. Linux doesn't advertise much which is all but the kiss of death here. Then of course there is the fact that a new computer comes with Windows, unless one actually has knowledge/desire to search for one with another OS, and that is rare. My latest computer came with Vista and since it was on special, didn't even offer an XP "downgrade", so I bought a fresh copy of XP. Problem solved, right? Wrong! XP didn't recognize my HD, so I was p'ed. However, good advice came from "LINUX_newbies", a Yahoo group. Install Linux Mint and VirtualBox and put XP there. Problem solved! (Thanks, Loyal!) Bottom line...anyone who isn't using Linux is missing out, but at least it's here, and getting better all the time. Mark P.S. There are so many great distro's out there, as everyone knows, but if you haven't tried Mint you must! Great desktop, great hardware recognition (it even found my WiFi), and, since it's built on Ubuntu, great repository.

Mahdee
Mahdee

WOW! Its great to see Bangladesh is in top of atleast one list :D I am a linux user and from Bangladesh :)

Rahul
Rahul

Cool. Nice to see more people from Nepal getting more into Linux operating system. ;)

Deming
Deming

It's amazing that some people are actually thinking this is a competition rather than simply statistics of popularity related to Linux distributions. This isn't a competition people! Grow up. But keep in mind the results is a guesstimate and shouldn't be taken too seriously.

Black_Claw
Black_Claw

I am linux/unix users and I have to agree that linux UI are sucks. Mouse button won't fix anything when you need to do something with the system.

Ty
Ty like.author.displayName 1 Like

Novell and Sco are in Utah.

ambro_86
ambro_86

@Ty And Overstock.com, and many others really. 

VIANCOM
VIANCOM

I am Indonesian, and i know what my country need is Free and Open Source Operating System... Linux of course! Many years ago computer was very expensive in Indonesia, and Windows is the leader in computer OS. Now, we can see Linux dominated in many major aspect of life. Most of laptop use Linux here, Internet Cafe use linux too, home desktop, PDA, and in education we use linux. Many people here use dual-OS (Windows and Linux), most of them use Linux-inside-Windows. Now we can see that Linux is in our heart... we hate non-free OS... we prefer develop Free OS and Ubuntu is the Friendly User here... We love Linux because it's viruses-free... Good by Windows.. Good by ilegal OS.. Good by non-Free-OS.. Welcome for Linux... all of Linux platform NB: Windows akan musnah dari bumi Indonesia dalam kurun waktu kurang dari 10 tahun ke depan sepanjang harga OS legal masih mahal. Juga akan musnah bila masih sering meng-Operasi OS illegal di setiap sudut negeri ini. Karena rakyat Indonesia lebih suka beli beras dan BBM daripada beli Windows Original. So, Pilih mana, Windows Original dengan harga Rp.100 ribu atau MUSNAH DARI BUMI INDONESIA? itu PR buat Microsoft!!! Mohon maaf jika komentar saya menggangu dan terima kasih karena sudah dibaca dan dicermati. :) Linux :( Windows :| others

Dicky B. Widhyatmoko
Dicky B. Widhyatmoko

Indonesia, i work for linux user groups in Surabaya call KLAS (Kelompok Linux Arek Suroboyo), we try to introduce linux all over the school in here, so they can develop their IT curriculum with a new face :-). Hopefully about 4 years further we can have a brand new tought about education

Shoreacre
Shoreacre

A problem with migrating to Linux is the fact that most PCs (desktops,laptops) are purchased with pre-installed Microsoft software , be it Windows XP or Vista. And that the warranty applies to hardware + installed software. Here in the UK many vendors consider the (usually 1 year) warranty as void when the user removes M$ software ,replacing it by Linux or BSD etc or making it dual boot. Dedicated Linux PCs are available but are surprisingly more expensive than hardware with pre-installed M$ software. Unless there are more 'unfair competition' complaints regarding pre-installed M$ software and the current warranty regime is maintained , Linux will have a hard time to become the dominant OS , if ever (sadly) Frank in northern Scotland

Shailesh
Shailesh

Hello, I am from India. I agree with some of our friends comments above. The current situation in Inida wrt Linux is simply amazing. People have satrted using Linux right from University level then going with Red Hat courses offered here from some reknowned institution. Currently Red Hat, Fedora and this year Ubuntu has become so attractive. I have a friend circle which talks about "Linux Server", RHLC, Cent OS. Many people including me though wont work on linux in office but have Linux Ubuntu or Red Hat or Fedora installed in personal computer at home.

irul
irul

wow.. what surprising me is that Indonesia is in the top five of four of the distributions....now i'm proud being indonesian...bravo for indonesian and open software..:)

deepak
deepak

I think Ubuntu and fedora rock. ubuntu is more user friendly and fedora is also stable with Gnome but how feasible is using synaptic or apt-get or Yum especially in places whree people use dialup?? thats where linux's popularity goes down.

Filibuster
Filibuster

I notised that Bobo from Russia searched the term "Ubuntu" in cyrilic language (Russian letters). If you add Western letters to the search, the result will differ - e.g. Ubuntu: http://www.google.com/insights/search/#cat=&q=%D1%83%D0%B1%D1%83%D0%BD%D1%82%D1%83%20%2Bubuntu&geo=&date=&clp=&cmpt=q Fedora: http://www.google.com/insights/search/#cat=&q=%D1%84%D0%B5%D0%B4%D0%BE%D1%80%D0%B0%20%2Bfedora&geo=&date=&clp=&cmpt=q Debian: http://www.google.com/insights/search/#cat=&q=%D0%B4%D0%B5%D0%B1%D0%B8%D0%B0%D0%BD%20%2Bdebian&geo=&date=&clp=&cmpt=q Mandriva: http://www.google.com/insights/search/#cat=&q=%D0%BC%D0%B0%D0%BD%D0%B4%D1%80%D0%B8%D0%B2%D0%B0%20%2Bmandriva&geo=&date=&clp=&cmpt=q With that said, checking derivates of Ubuntu, as Linux Mint, I see that this is a very popular distro in my home country Norway. I also thinkt that new mini pcs as Acer One will show in the statistics with regards to Linpus (Fedora derivate): http://www.google.com/insights/search/#cat=&q=Linpus&geo=&date=&clp=&cmpt=q Cheers

Filibuster
Filibuster

I notised that Bobo from Russia searched the term "Ubuntu" in cyrilic language (Russian letters). If you add Western letters to the search, the result will differ - e.g. Ubuntu: http://www.google.com/insights/search/#cat=&q=%D1%83%D0%B1%D1%83%D0%BD%D1%82%D1%83%20%2Bubuntu&geo=&date=&clp=&cmpt=q Fedora: http://www.google.com/insights/search/#cat=&q=%D1%84%D0%B5%D0%B4%D0%BE%D1%80%D0%B0%20%2Bfedora&geo=&date=&clp=&cmpt=q Debian: http://www.google.com/insights/search/#cat=&q=%D0%B4%D0%B5%D0%B1%D0%B8%D0%B0%D0%BD%20%2Bdebian&geo=&date=&clp=&cmpt=q Mandriva: http://www.google.com/insights/search/#cat=&q=%D0%BC%D0%B0%D0%BD%D0%B4%D1%80%D0%B8%D0%B2%D0%B0%20%2Bmandriva&geo=&date=&clp=&cmpt=q With that said, checking derivates of Ubuntu, as Linux Mint, I see that this is a very popular distro in my home country Norway. I also thinkt that new mini pcs as Acer One will show in the statistics with regards to Linpus (Fedora derivate): http://www.google.com/insights/search/#cat=&q=Linpus&geo=&date=&clp=&cmpt=q Cheers

Pietro
Pietro

gentoo and Czech Republic rulez :-)

gx
gx

And by the way..I'm very passionate about GentooLinux and FreeBSD system :P. [I had to write it :P]

gx
gx

As my fellow drew said, the Czech Republic shall not be considered as some east desert ;]. But stick to the topic - GNU/Linux, among BSD-based systems, is widely-spread among the public and students/admins as well (and no - it's not because of low income :P). There are also many machines with Windows nor Mac on it, although I'd like to say otherwise.

drew
drew

Being from Czech Republic, I must rant a bit - I would not consider us being in the east (nor poland or hungary - or greece).

Atle
Atle

There was someone who wondered about Africa. There is not tooo much computers there yet, and 99,9 of them run Windows without a license, witch means that they will drown in viruses, problems and never really get going. But there are some projects going on to resolve this. http://forum.slitaz.org/viewtopic.php?pid=3531#p3531 Its a very exciting time to live in, when it comes to Linux, due to the incredible flexibility of most unix and linux operating systems. Br Atle Zambia

MR.D
MR.D

Hey what about Puerto Rico!

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