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Archive for the ‘Guest posts’ Category

Troubleshooting SysRq

This is a post by guest blogger Wesley David. You can find more information about Wesley at the end of the article.

I have in two articles introduced you to SysRq and shared with you various ways it can be used. Now, in the last part of the series, I turn to troubleshooting SysRq with topics including what do you do if you don’t have a SysRq key, and limiting the capabilities of SysRq.

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Further exploring the SysRq support in Linux

The sysrq key

This is a post by guest blogger Wesley David. You can find more information about Wesley at the end of the article.

In my last article “Every sysadmin needs a little SysRq magic” I introduced Linux’s implementation of the SysRq feature that was created years ago in an era of computing history that is rapidly being forgotten. In this follow up article, I’d like to deepen your understanding of Linux’s SysRq support.

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Google

Underneath its simple exterior, the Google search algorithm is a complex beast that calculates rankings and returns results at lightening speeds. It has progressed from humble beginnings to something very sophisticated indeed.

As businesses, we hold our breath with every update and celebrate the success of uplift or pick up the pieces from a penalty. These updates commonly have names, which have become infamous recently – Panda or Penguin anyone?

How well do you know Dewey or Jagger though? Here is an interactive timeline (with a humorous edge) that details the entire catalog of Google search updates since its origin in 1998. Enjoy!

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Every sysadmin needs a little SysRq magic

sysreq key

This is a post by guest blogger Wesley David. You can find more information about Wesley at the end of the article.

Glance down at your keyboard. Look to the top right, somewhere above or around the “Page Up” and “Home” keys. If you’ve got a keyboard that follows long standing convention (at least if you’re using a PC), you’ll see a key that has the cryptic word “SysRq” on it somewhere, possibly as an alternate function. It likely shares a key with the words “Print Screen.” If you have a modern Lenovo laptop, you can stop searching for that key, however. In a bold departure from tradition, Thinkpads have recently been bereft of that oft neglected key.

What is this strange key and what does it mean anyway? “SysRQ” is short for the general term “system request”, however that doesn’t shed much light on its purpose. For that kind of information, we’ll need to step into our wayback machine and take a gander at computing history.

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Mozilla released Firefox 3.5 into the wild on June 30, prompting millions of downloads and a ton of mentions in tech press and blogs all over the world.

Considering all this attention, Firefox should have been a pretty hot search topic on Google that day. Right?

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This has to be one of the more bizarre gadgets we’ve seen lately. It’s a Japanese device called the Akiduki Pulse box that automatically posts your heart rate to Twitter.

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Google wants your help to make the Web faster

This week Google launched a new Web community on code.google.com/speed. The goal is to help Web developers speed up their Web applications, but the long-term goal is even more ambitious; to work together to make the Web as a whole a lot faster.

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Microsoft has been drumming up its marketing for Internet Explorer 8 lately, with some interesting results. That marketers can be a bit, shall we say… “creative”… when touting a product is well known, but the question is if Microsoft’s marketing team hasn’t taken it a bit too far with their “Get the Facts” campaign, especially when they start comparing IE8 to other web browsers.

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Financial Times just published an article about the “secret war on web crooks.” The article contains several interesting tidbits of information about spam and the challenges of trying to prevent it.

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A visual explanation of how DNS lookups work

Most reasonably technical Internet users have a pretty good idea what DNS is, but what actually happens when you look up a domain name is not always so clear. For those of you who are a bit uncertain of how it works (or just like geeky server charts), we found an excellent picture describing the chain of events of a DNS lookup.

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