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Posts Tagged ‘linux’

As we say happy birthday to Linus Torvalds today, he should be a happy chap because Linux is now the dominating OS on consumer computing devices. According to IDC and Goldman Sachs, as reported by the Seattle Times, Android (which is based on Linux) runs on 42% of all consumer computing devices.

How can that be?

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The state of Linux (infographic)

As LinuxCon Europe starts today in Barcelona, we present an infographic about the state of Linux. It has details about distributions, the Linux kernel, the Linux job market, drivers for adoption, and much more.

In addition to taking a look at the state of Linux, we want to give everyone attending LinuxCon Europe a really cool gift: a 1-year FREE Pingdom Business Account.

Read on to find out more about Linux as well as how to claim your FREE Pingdom account.

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visopsysVisopsys (VISual OPerating SYStem) is an alternative operating system for PC-compatible computers, developed almost exclusively by one person, Andy McLaughlin, since its inception in 1997.

Andy is a 30-something programmer from Canada, who, via Boston and San Jose ended up in London, UK, where he spends much of his spare time developing Visopsys,

We had the great fortune to catch up with Andy via email and ask him questions about Visopsys, why he started the project in the first place, and where is it going in the future.

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Troubleshooting SysRq

This is a post by guest blogger Wesley David. You can find more information about Wesley at the end of the article.

I have in two articles introduced you to SysRq and shared with you various ways it can be used. Now, in the last part of the series, I turn to troubleshooting SysRq with topics including what do you do if you don’t have a SysRq key, and limiting the capabilities of SysRq.

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Further exploring the SysRq support in Linux

The sysrq key

This is a post by guest blogger Wesley David. You can find more information about Wesley at the end of the article.

In my last article “Every sysadmin needs a little SysRq magic” I introduced Linux’s implementation of the SysRq feature that was created years ago in an era of computing history that is rapidly being forgotten. In this follow up article, I’d like to deepen your understanding of Linux’s SysRq support.

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Every sysadmin needs a little SysRq magic

sysreq key

This is a post by guest blogger Wesley David. You can find more information about Wesley at the end of the article.

Glance down at your keyboard. Look to the top right, somewhere above or around the “Page Up” and “Home” keys. If you’ve got a keyboard that follows long standing convention (at least if you’re using a PC), you’ll see a key that has the cryptic word “SysRq” on it somewhere, possibly as an alternate function. It likely shares a key with the words “Print Screen.” If you have a modern Lenovo laptop, you can stop searching for that key, however. In a bold departure from tradition, Thinkpads have recently been bereft of that oft neglected key.

What is this strange key and what does it mean anyway? “SysRQ” is short for the general term “system request”, however that doesn’t shed much light on its purpose. For that kind of information, we’ll need to step into our wayback machine and take a gander at computing history.

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Weekend reading

That’s quite a mix, isn’t it? Ruby, Linux, Turing, and Windows 8. But there’s even more: Jira, HyperCard, and Flamer, as well. We take a slightly different approach this week and bring you a wild mix of interesting reading on various topics from around the interwebs. Hopefully you’ll enjoy this eclectic mix while you enjoy your weekend.

Every Friday we bring you a collection of links to places on the web that we find particularly newsworthy, interesting, entertaining, and topical. We try to focus on some particular area or topic each week, but in general we will cover Internet, web development, networking, performance, security, and other geeky topics.

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UbuntuDevelopers who want a portable computer to code on, which is thin, light, sleek and yet powerful, may now be getting another option in an ultrabook from Dell. What makes the “Sputnik” ultrabook different is that it runs Ubuntu 12.04 Linux and it’s tailor-made for developers.

Every Friday we bring you a collection of links to places on the web that we find particularly newsworthy, interesting, entertaining, and topical. We try to focus on some particular area or topic each week, but in general we will cover Internet, web development, networking, performance, security, and other geeky topics.

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Google Chrome OS – Weekend must-read articles #14

Google Chrome OSThis week we thought you would be interested in reading about what’s been happening with Google’s Chrome OS.

Google has added functionality, like support for Google Drive, as well as a new UI, but the OS has still not gained mainstream adoption. We picked out a few articles that may help you make up your mind about where Chrome OS is headed.

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Linux kernel development by the numbers

In the report “Linux kernel development,” the Linux Foundation details the development of the Linux kernel by presenting fascinating statistics.

The report contains lots of amazing numbers, which together offer an insight into the tremendous amount of work that goes on behind the scenes to develop the kernel, the core of the Linux OS.

We jumped head first into the report and extracted as much information as we could. Read on to get a real up-close look at the Linux kernel.

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