Pingdom Home

US + international: +1-212-796-6890

SE + international: +46-21-480-0920

Business hours 3 am-11:30 am EST (Mon-Fri).

Do you know if your website is up right now? We do! LEARN MORE

Posts Tagged ‘reliability’

website downtimeIt may not be something you lay awake at night thinking about, but what if your website would happen to be down for one or a few minutes, would Google then penalize you for that?

Since we all worry about what Google thinks about our sites so that we can appear as favorably in its services as possible, hearing straight from Google would be worth a lot, and now we have.

Read more

cloud storage pingdomAre you storing your files in the cloud? If you are, which cloud storage service are you using? Storing files in the cloud is convenient, but it means you want fast and reliable access to your information at any given time. And if the service is unavailable or your Internet connection is messing up you are in a pickle.

Last year we investigated the reliability and performance of four popular cloud storage services: Box, Dropbox, Google Drive, and SkyDrive. We repeated the same study a year later. Read on to find out what the situation is like in 2013.

Read more

cloud storageThe cloud storage war is heating up. Dropbox is getting more and more competition, and now Google has joined the fray with Google Drive. We’re not going to compare features in this article, but rather test something we can actually measure. And since we here at Pingdom do site monitoring we have focused on how these services compare in terms of performance and reliability.

To make this survey even more interesting, we also added two other file hosting services: Microsoft’s SkyDrive and Box.com. They should give us some additional perspective.

To monitor reliability and performance, in this specific case we thought their homepages were less important than the actual file hosting they offer, so that is what we focused on. We uploaded the same identical file to the four services, a small PNG image, and made it publicly available so we could monitor it.

Read more

The most reliable (and unreliable) blogging services of 2011

blogging services logos

There are millions upon millions of blogs available today, and many of them are hosted on dedicated blogging services. These kinds of services have been around for a long time, with pioneers like Blogger paving the way for WordPress.com and more recent arrivals like Tumblr.

One of the main benefits of using a blogging service is that they make blogging easy. There’s no need to deal with traditional hosting. You blog, the blogging service keeps your content available online.

In theory, blogging services should also be able to make your blog more reliable since they have a lot of servers at their disposal, often spread across multiple data centers. If your blog gets flooded by traffic (usually a good thing), a blogging service has a much better chance handling it since your traffic is just a drop in the ocean for them. Had you been on a single server (or even a shared one), your site might not have coped.

Read more

Blogging services

Blogging services have been around for a long time, with pioneers like Blogger paving the way for Wordpress.com and more recent arrivals like Tumblr and Posterous. There are millions upon millions of blogs out there, many of them residing on these services.

One big bonus of using a blogging service is that they take much of the pain away from having a blog since they handle the hosting for its users and everything is already set up. Once you publish, the responsibility for keeping that content available online rests firmly on the shoulders of the blogging service.

With that in mind, we decided to test five of today’s most popular blogging services to see how reliable they actually are.

Read more

Is Goo.gl really the fastest URL shortener? (chart)

Goo.gl versus other URL shorteners

A few weeks ago, Google made its URL shortener, Goo.gl, open for everyone and gave it its own website, similar to Bit.ly’s. Previously, Goo.gl could only be used by Google’s own services.

When they announced this, Google made a pretty bold statement: “… we do want it to be the stablest, most secure, and fastest URL shortener on the web.”

That’s something that we should test, isn’t it?

Read more

Is the Web heading toward redirect hell?

Loading...Google is doing it. Facebook is doing it. Yahoo is doing it. Microsoft is doing it. And soon Twitter will be doing it.

We’re talking about the apparent need of every web service out there to add intermediate steps to sample what we click on before they send us on to our real destination. This has been going on for a long time and is slowly starting to build into something of a redirect hell on the Web.

And it has a price.

Read more

Website downtime

Downtime sucks. When your website is down, it might as well be invisible. That alone should be reason enough to monitor your website’s availability, but just to really push home this point, here are another 19 excellent reasons why you should monitor your website.

Read more

New! Find DNS problems with Pingdom Tools

DNS test in Pingdom Tools

DNS, the Domain Name System, is a vital part of the Internet. And since it’s such a vital part of the Internet, it’s important that websites have correct DNS settings. If they don’t, it can lead to a number of problems, one of them being downtime. On top of that, bad DNS settings can be hard to track down and can cause a lot of head ache for webmasters and site owners.

We here at Pingdom run a website monitoring service that tracks the uptime of tens of thousands of websites for our users, so we deal with site issues on a daily basis. Over time, it has become exceedingly clear that a large portion of the various errors we detect are caused by bad DNS settings or poorly configured DNS servers.

This is why we now are introducing an addition to our free webmaster tools: a DNS health test.

Read more

Facebook as a single point of failure for the Web

Facebook at the center of the web

If Facebook has its way (and it usually does), over the coming years a ton of websites and online services will become part of the open graph that Facebook is promoting, with Facebook firmly planted in the middle. The concept is very interesting, and the potential for this web of data from a wide variety of sources is enormous. You could say that Facebook will tie all our information, and the whole web, together.

There’s just one problem (two, if you count privacy): When the web becomes “interconnected” with Facebook, it also means that when Facebook breaks, the web breaks. In short, Facebook becomes a single point of failure for the web.

Read more